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The Visible Scholar

Lessons from Two Decades of Monitoring Data from the Gypsy Moth Invasion Front

Thursday, September 27, 2018
12 noon – 12:45 p.m.
Research & Collaborative Study Area, 1st Floor, Boatwright Library

grayson

Dr. Kristine Grayson
Assistant Professor of Biology
School of Arts and Sciences

Why do we find species in one location and not another? What determines if an invasive species spreads? These are fundamental ecological questions that requires detailed data on where a species occurs and where it does not, which are difficult to collect on a large scale. Research from the gypsy moth invasion front offers one of the most extensive and detailed records of a species border ever attempted. Federal and state efforts to manage the gypsy moth invasion have spanned an area from Wisconsin to North Carolina with up to 100,000 pheromone baited traps per year over the last two decades. Countless studies have advanced ecological theory using this system and a wealth of opportunities remain for better understanding spatial spread, range limits, and low density population dynamics.

Dr. Grayson’s gypsy-moth related publications:

May, C., N. Hillerbrand, L.M. Thompson, T.M. Faske, E. Martinez, D. Parry, S.J. Agosta, and K.L. Grayson. 2018. Geographic variation in larval metabolic rate between northern and southern populations of the invasive gypsy moth. Journal of Insect Science 18: 1-7.

Grayson, K.L., and D.M. Johnson. 2018. Novel insights on population and range edge dynamics using an unparalleled spatiotemporal record of species invasion. Journal of Animal Ecology 87: 581 – 593. Shortlisted for the Sidnie Manton Award (for an outstanding synthesis paper by an early career author).

Thompson, L.M., T.M. Faske, N. Banahene, D. Grim, S.J. Agosta, D. Parry, P.C. Tobin, D.M. Johnson, and K.L. Grayson. 2017. Variation in growth and developmental responses to supraoptimal temperatures near latitudinal range limits of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (L.)), an expanding invasive species. Physiological Entomology 42: 181 – 190.

Thompson, L.M., K.L. Grayson, and D.M. Johnson. 2016. Forest edges enhance mate-finding in the invasive European gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 158: 295 – 303.

Grayson, K.L., D. Parry, T. Faske, A. Hamilton, P.C. Tobin, S.J. Agosta, and D.M. Johnson. 2015. Performance of wild and laboratory-reared gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae): A comparison between foliage and artificial diet. Environmental Entomology 44: 864 – 873.

May, C., N. Hillerbrand, L.M. Thompson, T.M. Faske, E. Martinez, D. Parry, S.J. Agosta, and K.L. Grayson. 2018. Data from: Geographic variation in larval metabolic rate between northern and southern populations of the invasive gypsy moth. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.235c48n

Thompson, L.M., T.M. Faske, N. Banahene, D. Grim, S.J. Agosta, D. Parry, P.C. Tobin, D.M. Johnson, and K.L. Grayson. 2017. Data from: Variation in growth and developmental responses to supraoptimal temperatures near latitudinal range limits of gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.), an expanding invasive species. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.49b6j7t

Additional publications are located in the UR Scholarship Repository.

Taking place in an open venue in the library, “The Visible Scholar Series” provides a space for informal faculty talks on new publications. Students, staff and faculty can listen and view a “scholar in action".